Skip to Content

Editorial Style Guide

Expand or Collapse all.

What is an editorial style guide?

Is it alumnus or alumna? Dr. John Doe or John Doe, Ph.D.? The 1980’s or 1980s? Anyone who writes or edits university communications will encounter questions like these. Editorial style guides, which suggest consistent treatment of dates, names, capitalization and abbreviations, offer answers to such questions.

Our editorial style is a major component of how we present ourselves to the public. Having a common style helps us project a consistent, professional image.

Who should use this guide?

This guide is for anyone who writes, edits or proofreads Texas State University communications, including brochures, booklets, posters, postcards, websites, invitations, etc. Academic papers and publications often follow separate, field-specific style guides.

Social media managers should also refer to our social media style guide.

Where do these styles come from?

Our guidelines draw heavily from the Associated Press (AP) style because it is familiar to readers and easy to use. But since the university’s needs are not the same as those of the news media, some exceptions to AP style are made. In those instances, the Chicago Manual of Style, 16th Edition, is referenced. For instances not addressed in this guide, reference the current edition of the AP Stylebook and then Merriam-Webster’s Collegiate Dictionary, 11th Edition.

What about social media style?

This Editorial Style Guide will be a valuable resource. However, social media managers will encounter unique challenges when communicating with their audiences. For that purpose we maintain a social media style guide and some general guidelines.

Please contact us if you have questions or suggested revisions.


A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | XYZ

a, an

Use “a” before words that begin with consonants or before words beginning with vowels that sound like consonants: a union; a once-in-a-lifetime event. Use “an” before words that begin with vowels or vowel sounds. When a word begins with “h,” use “a” if the “h” is pronounced: a historic event. Use “an” if the “h” is not pronounced: an hour; an honor.

AACSB International

The accreditation organization of the McCoy College of Business Administration. AACSB International - The Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business is the name of the organization. On first reference, correct usage is the full name of the organization, AACSB International - The Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business; on second and continuing references, it is acceptable to use AACSB International or AACSB.

abbreviations and acronyms

  • Dr. may be used on first reference before the name of a person who holds a doctorate, but to avoid any confusion regarding the person being a medical doctor, the person’s specialty should be stated in the first or second reference unless the context makes it clear that the person is not a medical doctor. Avoid using Dr. before the last name in subsequent references; last name only is preferred. Do not use Dr. before the name of a person who holds an honorary doctorate.
  • Do not use both Dr. and Ph.D. with a name. NOT Dr. Jane Williams, Ph.D. Use either Dr. Jane Williams or Jane Williams, Ph.D. See also academic degrees and titles.
  • Abbreviate junior or senior after a person’s name, and do not set it off with a comma unless the person has indicated his preference is to include a comma: Martin Luther King Jr.
  • Omit periods in abbreviations or acronyms unless the result would spell an unrelated word. But use periods in two-letter abbreviations: U.S., U.N. (but not GI). Use all caps, but no periods, in longer abbreviations and acronyms when the individual letters are pronounced: ABC, FBI. Use only an initial cap and then lowercase letters for acronyms of more than six letters, unless otherwise listed in the AP Stylebook or Webster’s New World College Dictionary.
  • Do not abbreviate company or corporation when used after the business name. (This is a deviation from most style guides.) Do abbreviate incorporated (Inc.) or limited (Ltd.) when used following a business name.

ABCs

No apostrophe is necessary. It’s plural, not possessive.

academic departments

See departments, academic.

academic degrees

Lowercase names of degrees, fellowships and the like: a master’s degree; a doctorate; a fellowship; a master of business administration. Please note the capitalization and punctuation used in the following examples:

  • associate degree (not associate’s)
  • bachelor’s degree
  • bachelor of arts
  • bachelor of fine arts
  • bachelor of music
  • bachelor of science
  • master’s degree
  • master of arts
  • master of science
  • doctorate
  • doctoral degree

Abbreviations: Use an abbreviation such as B.A., B.F.A., B.M., B.S., M.A., M.B.A., M.F.A., M.S., M.S.W., Ph.D. or Ed.D. only if writing out the full name of the degree is too cumbersome for the context (such as in an advertisement), on second reference after you have written out the full name of the degree, and after a full name, set off by a comma: Jane Doe, M.A. ’97, won the award.

academic honors

Cum laude, magna cum laude, summa cum laude and with distinction receive no special treatment in running copy: She graduated magna cum laude.

academic titles

The university’s style for academic titles follows that of the Chicago Manual of Style, 16th Edition.

In general, capitalize a formal title used directly before a name. Lowercase and use commas to set off a title following a name. Lowercase and spell out titles when not used with names.

Exception: In formal contexts, such as a displayed list of names and titles in an annual report, titles are usually capitalized even when following a name. Exceptions may also be called for in promotional or other contexts for reasons of courtesy or politics, as long as capitalization is handled consistently within a document or suite of documents.

Capitalize and spell out formal titles such as chancellor, dean, president, chair, professor, associate professor, assistant professor, etc., only when they directly precede names. Lowercase elsewhere. Chair is the name for the heads of Texas State departments. Use chair rather than chairman, chairwoman or chairperson. Note the capitalization and format of these examples:

the professor; John Smith, professor of literature; Professor Smith but history professor John Smith (a label rather than a title); professors Smith and Jones

the chair; Ann Jones, chair of the Department of Finance and Economics; Professor Jones

the provost; Bob Williams, provost and vice president for Academic Affairs; Dr. Williams

the president; Jane Smith, president of Texas State University; Dr. Smith or President Smith

the dean; John Jones, dean of the College of Education; Dean Jones

named professorships: Joe Williams, Texas State’s Roy F. and Joann Cole Mitte Chair in Creative Writing; James Jones, McCoy Endowed Chair in Business    

 Dr. may be used on first reference before the name of a person who holds a doctorate. Unless the context makes it clear that the person is not a medical doctor, the person’s specialty should be stated in the first or second reference. Avoid using Dr. before the last name in subsequent references; last name only is preferred. Do not use Dr. before the name of a person who holds an honorary doctorate.

Also see titles.

accept, except 

Accept means to receive; except means to exclude: Everyone accepted the invitation except for Mary.

ACT

Don’t spell out the full name of this entrance examination, even on first reference. It is widely known. (This also applies to SAT, GMAT, GRE, etc.) Use Arabic numerals in constructions such as SAT-1. Use figures for ACT, SAT and similar test scores. Do not add commas to SAT or other scores that reach into the thousands: His SAT score was 1200. Her GRE composite score was 2070.

addresses

Use the abbreviations Ave., Blvd. and St. only with numbered addresses: 1600 Pennsylvania Ave. Spell them out and capitalize when part of a formal street name without a number or with just a block number: Pennsylvania Avenue, the 1200 block of Pennsylvania Avenue. Lowercase and spell out when used alone or with more than one street name: Massachusetts and Pennsylvania avenues. Exception: Abbreviations are acceptable on maps if space is limited.

All shorter words (road, alley, lane, drive, etc.) are always spelled out in running text or address listings: 601 University Drive. It’s acceptable to abbreviate these words on a map if space is limited.

Always use figures for an address number: 7 Green St.

Spell out and capitalize first through ninth when used as street names; use figures with two letters for 10th and above: 1202 Sixth St.; 100 12th St.

Abbreviate compass points used to indicate directional ends of a street or quadrants of a city in a numbered address: 222 E. 42nd St.; 600 K St. N.W. Do not abbreviate if the number is omitted: East 42nd Street; K Street Northwest.

See the list of Texas State streets for the proper spelling of the names of streets on the Texas State campus.

Advanced Law Enforcement Rapid Response Training Center (ALERRT)

A center at Texas State that trains first-responding law enforcement officers. Write out the full name on first reference, and use ALERRT on subsequent references.

advisor

Not adviser. Used when referring to a person who offers advice in an academic setting on degree programs, course work, etc. (This is a deviation from AP style.)

affect/effect

Affect is always a verb: Your vote will affect the outcome. Effect is used most often as a noun but is sometimes a verb: We aren’t sure what that effect will be, but we hope it will effect positive change.

African-American

Use a hyphen when used as a noun or an adjective. The AP Stylebook prefers “black,” but African-American is acceptable if you are certain the person is indeed African-American. Be sensitive to the true ethnicity of other black people, such as Jamaican-Americans, or black people from other countries. Other terms to consider: minorities, ethnic minorities. (Note: The national month of observation is called Black History Month.)

afterward, backward, forward, toward

No final “s” is needed.

ages

Always use figures for ages of people, animals and inanimate objects. When the context does not require years or years old, the figure is presumed to be years.

Ages expressed as adjectives before a noun or as substitutes for a noun use hyphens: 5-year-old girl, but the girl is 5 years old. The boy, 6, has a sister, 10. The woman, 29, has a daughter who is 2 months old. The race is for 60-year-olds. The 18- to 34-year-old demographic is elusive to advertisers. The man is in his 40s.

Alkek Library

The formal name is the Albert B. Alkek Library. Alkek Library is also acceptable on first reference. The building was opened in 1990 and named in 1991 in honor of Alkek, a Houston oilman and philanthropist.

all-

To be selected as the best (as at a sport) within an area or organization. Capitalize when part of a formal name: All-Sun Belt Conference, All-American, but lowercase when used generally: all-conference.

all right

Never allright or alright.

“Alma Mater”

The name of the university’s song. Capitalize the first letters of each word and enclose this song title in quotation marks. If not referring to the name of the Texas State school song, lowercase the term alma mater, which refers to a school or university one has attended and is also the general term for a school or university’s song.

a lot

Not alot. (But avoid using “a lot” in anything but the most informal of writings.)

alumni, alumnus, alumna, alumnae

alumnus – the male or nonspecific gender singular

alumni – the masculine or mixed-gender plural

alumna – the feminine singular form

alumnae – the feminine plural

Alumni Association

The formal name and preferred usage is the Texas State Alumni Association. Use the full name on first reference. When referring specifically to Texas State's alumni association, Alumni Association (capped) is acceptable on subsequent references. When referring generally to an alumni association, always lowercase.

Alumni House

In 2014 this building was renamed the Center for Student Retention.

a.m.

Lowercase with periods. Avoid the redundant 9 p.m. tonight or 10 a.m. in the morning. See also times.

among, between

Use between when referring to two items; use among when referring to more than two items.

ampersand (&)

Use only if it is part of an official title; otherwise, spell out the word “and.”

and, but

And or but may begin a sentence. This approach can be useful in providing a transition, but it shouldn’t be overdone.

annual

Do not use the term “first annual.” Instead mention that plans are to hold the event annually. Do not use annual as a synonym for yearbook.

anxious/eager

Anxious has a more negative meaning than eager. Someone is anxious if they are extremely uneasy or worrying about some contingency. Someone is eager if they are enthusiastic or have an impatient desire or interest.

approximately

Avoid this word. Use about.

Aquarena Center 

Now The Meadows Center for Water and the Environment.

archaeology

Preferred spelling (rather than archeology).

as well as

Avoid overusing “as well as” in place of “and”; the phrase “as well as” has the sense of “too” or “also,” rather than simply “and.”

athletic/athletics

Athletic is an adjective; athletics is a noun: He attended an athletic event. Athletics are exercises, sports or games engaged in by athletes.

Austin Metropolitan Area

Capitalize all three words. San Marcos is part of the Austin Metropolitan Area.

award

Capitalize the word “award” only when it is part of the official name of an award.

backward, forward, toward, afterward

No final “s” is needed.

barbecue

Not barbeque, BBQ or Bar-B-Q, unless it is in the formal name of a business.

because, since 

Use “because” to note a cause-effect relationship. Avoid using “as” in place of because: He went because he was told; not as he was told. Use “since” to note a time element: He has been sick since Tuesday.

Sallie Beretta Outstanding Senior Woman Award

Since 1963, the university has given the award to an outstanding senior woman based on leadership, scholarship, character, potential and loyalty. It is named for Sallie Beretta, who served on the university’s board of regents from 1933 to 1951.

better, more

“Better” refers to quality. “More” refers to quantity. This book is a better book than the last one I read. I need to buy more books.

between

See among, between

Big 12 Conference

Not Big XII.

Bill Miller Room

A room located on the west concourse of Bobcat Stadium. The room is a hospitality area for former Texas State letterwinners and is open during halftime of all home football games.

black

The term preferred by the AP Stylebook and considered acceptable in all references. Always lowercased. See also African-American.

Board of Regents

Texas State University is governed by The (capitalize “The”) Texas State University System Board of Regents; the Board of Regents is acceptable on second reference.

Bobcat

Capitalize when referring to the Texas State mascot or a Texas State student. Lowercase when referring to the animal in general. When referring to a Texas State athletic team, use "the Texas State Bobcats." Never refer to a women's sport team as "the Lady Bobcats." All Texas State student-athletes are Bobcats.

Bobcat Baseball Ballpark

Capitalize all three words in this official name of the location where the Bobcat baseball team plays.

Bobcat Buck$

Bobcat Buck$ is a convenient, secure purchasing feature for students' BobcatCard (student ID). It is a prepaid, university-managed flexible spending account for purchases both on and off campus.

Bobcat Build

The Texas State community’s largest annual student-run public service event in which students participate in neighborhood cleanups, nursing home cleaning, school playground work, green space and river cleanups.

BobcatCard

A Texas State student ID card

Bobcat Pause 

A memorial service that honors students, staff, faculty and alumni who died during the year.

Bobcat Preview

A program that all incoming freshmen are required to attend prior to the start of the fall semester to help ease their transition into college life.

Bobcat Soccer Complex

(Frequently referred to as the West Campus Athletic Complex) Texas State's women's soccer team uses this facility as do several club sports, including lacrosse.

Bobcat Softball Stadium

Capitalize all three words in this official name of the location where the Bobcat softball team plays.

Bobcat Stadium

Texas State’s 30,000-seat football stadium. In November 2003, the field was renamed Jim Wacker Field in honor of the former football coach who died that year.

Boko

Capitalize the name of Texas State’s Bobcat mascot.

book titles

See titles.

breaks

Capitalize only proper nouns: spring break, winter break, Thanksgiving break.

buildings

Capitalize the word “building” as part of the name: the J.C. Kellam Administration Building, the Supple Science Building. When referring to a room in a building, give the building’s name and the room number and capitalize “Room”: Flowers Hall, Room 234; Old Main, Room 102.

  • Academic Services Building (North or South), ASB
  • Angelina Hall
  • Agriculture Building
  • Alkek Library, Alkek
  • Alkek Teaching Theater, Alkek Theater
  • Aqua Sports Center, ASC
  • Arnold Hall, Arnold
  • Beretta Hall, Beretta
  • Bexar Hall, Bexar
  • Blanco Hall, Blanco
  • Bobcat Baseball Ballpark
  • Bobcat Soccer Complex
  • Bobcat Softball Stadium
  • Bobcat Stadium, the stadium
  • Bobcat Village
  • Boko’s Living Room
  • Brazos Hall, Brazos
  • Brogdon Hall, Brogdon
  • Burleson Hall, Burleson
  • Butler Hall
  • Centennial Hall, Centennial
  • Central Receiving
  • Chautauqua Hall, Chautauqua
  • Chautauqua and Gaillardia Complex
  • Chemistry Building
  • Child Development Center, the center
  • Cogeneration Power and Chiller Plant
  • College Inn
  • College of Education Building, Education Building
  • Colorado Building
  • Comal Building
  • Commons Dining Hall, Commons
  • the Den
  • Derrick Hall, Derrick
  • Elliott Hall, Elliott
  • End Zone Complex, EZC
  • Evans Auditorium
  • Evans Liberal Arts Building, Evans
  • Falls Hall, Falls
  • Falls and Sayers Complex
  • Family & Consumer Sciences Building, FCS Building
  • Fire Station Studio
  • Flowers Hall, Flowers
  • Harold M. Freeman Aquatic Biology Building, Freeman Building
  • Freeman Ranch
  • Gaillardia Hall, Gaillardia
  • Glade Theatre
  • Harris Dining Hall, Harris
  • Health Professions Building, Health Professions
  • Hill House
  • Hines Academic Center, Hines
  • Hornsby Hall, Hornsby
  • Horticulture Center
  • Ivey-Moore House, Ivey-Moore
  • Jackson Hall, Jackson
  • J.C. Kellam Administration Building, JCK
  • Jim Wacker Field at Bobcat Stadium, Wacker Field
  • Joann Cole Mitte Art Building, JCM
  • Jones Dining Center, Jones
  • Jowers Center, Jowers
  • Lampasas Building, Lampasas
  • Lantana Hall, Lantana
  • Laurel Hall, Laurel
  • LBJ Amphitheater, amphitheater
  • LBJ Student Center Ballroom
  • LBJ Parking Garage
  • LBJ Student Center, LBJSC
  • LBJ Teaching Theater
  • Mainstage
  • Math/Computer Science Building, MCS
  • Emmett and Miriam McCoy Hall, McCoy Hall
  • The Meadows Center for Water and the Environment
  • Medina Building, Medina
  • Minifie Academic Atrium (in McCoy Hall)
  • Roy F. & Joann Cole Mitte Complex, Mitte Complex
  • San Gabriel Hall
  • Music Building
  • Music Building recital hall, recital hall
  • Nueces Hall, Nueces
  • Old Main
  • Outdoor Center
  • Paws-n-Go
  • Pecos Building
  • Pedernales Building, Pedernales
  • Performing Arts Center
  • Physical Plant
  • President's House
  • Recital Hall
  • Recycling Center
  • Retama Hall, Retama
  • Richard A. Castro Undergraduate Admissions Center
  • River House
  • Roy F. Mitte Technology and Physics Building, RFM
  • Sabinal Building, Sabinal
  • San Jacinto Hall, San Jacinto
  • San Marcos Hall
  • Science Greenhouse
  • Sewell Park, Sewell
  • Smith Hall, Smith
  • Smith House
  • Sterry Hall, Sterry
  • Strahan Coliseum, Strahan
  • Student Recreation Center, SRC
  • Student Health Center, Health Center
  • Jerome H. and Catherine E. Supple Science Building, Supple Science Building
  • Swinney House
  • Taylor-Murphy History Building, Taylor-Murphy
  • Texas State Tennis Center, Tennis Center
  • Theatre Center
  • Thornton International House
  • Tower Hall, Tower
  • Trinity Building, Trinity
  • Undergraduate Academic Center, UAC
  • University Camp
  • University Bookstore
  • University Press/West Warehouse
  • West Campus Practice Field
  • West Campus Competition Field
  • William W. and Elizabeth Adamson ROTC Building, Adamson Building

bulleted lists

  • The bullet takes the place of punctuation, such as commas or semicolons, between items. Don’t use punctuation at the ends of bulleted items that are not sentences. There is also no need for a concluding period at the end of a bulleted list, even when that list continues a sentence.
  • When your bulleted items are sentences, capitalize the first letter of each and use appropriate end punctuation. When they consist of single words or phrases, lowercased without punctuation is best.
  • Keep your bulleted lists consistent. If some of the items in a list are sentences, make all of them sentences. If some items begin with verbs, begin all items with verbs. Use the same verb tense within each sentence. In short publications, such as brochures, try to structure all your lists the same way, either sentences or not. In longer works, some variance is acceptable.

cafeteria

Use dining hall or name the hall specifically: Commons Dining Hall, Harris Dining Hall, Jones Dining Center, the Lair or the Den.

cancel, canceled, canceling, cancellation

Note the preferred spellings.

capitalization

  • For the sake of clarity and readability, this guide agrees with the Chicago Manual of Style’s plea for a “down style,” that is, one that avoids unnecessary capitalization: “Understanding is best served by capitalizing only what are clearly proper nouns and adjectives in the context under discussion.” In general, avoid unnecessary capitals. Capitalization does not confer prestige or importance; it’s what you say about a discipline or program that conveys quality or prestige to the reader. Use capital letters only if you can justify it by one of the principles listed here.
  • Academic disciplines: Do not capitalize the names of disciplines except for those that are derived from proper nouns: American history, English composition; criminal justice, engineering technology. See also disciplines, academic.
  • Compositions: For books, journals, newspapers and other freestanding publications as well as stories, poems, articles, etc., follow Chicago style: Always capitalize the first and last words both in titles and in subtitles and all other major words (nouns, pronouns, verbs, adjectives, adverbs and some conjunctions). Lowercase the articles the, a and an. Lowercase prepositions, regardless of length, except when they are stressed (through in A River Runs Through It), are used adverbially or adjectivally (up in Look Up, down in Turn Down, on in The On Button, etc.), are used as conjunctions (before in Look Before You Leap, etc.), or are part of a Latin expression used adjectivally or adverbially (De Facto, In Vitro, etc.). Lowercase the conjunctions and, but, for, or, nor. Lowercase the words to and as in any grammatical function, for simplicity’s sake. Lowercase the second part of a species name, such as lucius in Esox lucius, or the part of a proper name that would be lowercased in text, such as de or von. For words that can be used as prepositions, as adverbs, or as adjectives, consult the dictionary. For hyphenated terms, capitalize only the first element unless any subsequent element is a proper noun or adjective: Non-English-speaking. See also titles.
  • Derivatives: Capitalize words that are derived from a proper noun and still depend on it for their meaning: American, Christian, Christianity, English, French, Marxism, Shakespearean. Lowercase words that are derived from a proper noun but no longer depend on it for their meaning: french fries, herculean, manhattan cocktail, malapropism, pasteurize, quixotic, venetian blind.
  • Informal documents and forms: Do not capitalize the titles of forms or informal documents: exemption request form, housing contract, leave request, etc.
  • Popular names: Some places and events lack officially designated proper names but have popular names that are the equivalent: the Combat Zone (a section of downtown Boston), the South Side (of Chicago), the Badlands (of North Dakota). For Texas State, this includes the Quad, the Square, etc. This practice should not, however, be interpreted as a license to ignore the general practice of lowercasing the common noun elements of a name when they stand alone.
  • Birds, animals and plants: Capitalize only the part of the name that is a proper noun; do not capitalize any words that are not proper nouns: American alligator, Guadalupe bass, Mississippi kite, great blue heron, largemouth bass. When using scientific names, capitalize the genus and lowercase the species: little blue heron, Egretta caerulea.

cellphone

All one word. All lowercase unless used at the beginning of a sentence.

centers, Texas State

Capitalize names of centers at Texas State when using the formal name (Center for International Studies). Lowercase “center” when not using the full formal name: The center opened in 2005.

Formal names of centers at Texas State University:

Central Texas

Capitalize both words when referring to this region.

century

Lowercase and spell out numbers less than 10: the first century; the 19th century. For proper names, capitalize and/or follow the organization’s practice: Century 21 Realty; Twentieth Century Fund. Hyphenate only when the century forms a compound modifier: 18th-century architecture.

chair

Use this term to describe the head of an academic department at Texas State. (This is a deviation from AP style, which prefers chairman or chairwoman.) Do not use those terms unless they are part of an official title. See also academic titles.

chair, endowed

A professor who holds the chair in a discipline should be referred to as the professor of the discipline, keeping the name of the chair capitalized, even in shortened, casual references: Ann Wiliams, McCoy Endowed Chair in Accounting, led the discussion, or Ann Williams holds the McCoy Endowed Chair in Accounting.

Chautauqua Hill 

The hill that Old Main and Hill House sit on.

check in, check-in/checkout, check out

Use check in as a verb: Check in the equipment after using it. Hyphenate as a noun or an adjective: The check-in is at the conference. The check-in materials are at the front desk. Use checkout as one word when used as a noun or attributive noun: Please pay at the checkout. She works at the checkout counter. Use check out as two words when used as a verb: Please check out by noon.

Child Development Center

A day care center and teacher training facility located near San Marcos Hall on West Campus. Avoid using CDC on second reference when the communication will be received outside the university community, because CDC is a well-known abbreviation for Centers for Disease Control. Use “the center” on second reference instead.

class

In prose, do not capitalize, even when referring to specific classes: the class of 1989, class of ’89; 50th reunion class.

classification, student

Don’t capitalize freshman, sophomore, junior, senior, graduate, postgraduate, postdoctoral, nondegree, or any similar designation, unless it is part of a title, a headline or the official name of an organization.

coach

Capitalize when used before a name: Coach Bob Williams. Lowercase in all other uses.

coed

Don’t use this term as a noun to refer to a female student. It can be used as an adjective to indicate both sexes, however, such as a coed residence hall; no hyphen.

colleges

Capitalize the formal names of Texas State’s colleges. Lowercase when referring to the colleges generally or when not using the formal name: the business college. When referring to more than one college, do not capitalize “colleges”: the colleges of Applied Arts and Health Professions. The formal names of Texas State University colleges are:

  • College of Applied Arts
  • Emmett and Miriam McCoy College of Business Administration (McCoy College of Business Administration is also acceptable on first reference. McCoy College is commonly used also, but this shortened version should be used only on second and subsequent references.)
  • College of Education
  • College of Fine Arts and Communication
  • The Graduate College (Always use "The" with the name of the college and always capitalize, even in the middle of a sentence.)
  • College of Health Professions
  • College of Liberal Arts
  • College of Science and Engineering
  • University College (If “the” is used before the name in the middle of a sentence, it should not be capitalized.)
  • Honors College

colons

Capitalize the first letter after a colon if the clause that follows forms a complete sentence. Exceptions: titles of papers, articles, chapters and books, where the first word after colons will always be capitalized. Colons will usually go outside of quotation marks, but it depends on their use.

commas

  • Simple series: A hallmark of AP style is the omission of the comma before the conjunction in a simple series: red, white and blue. Although that rule strays from the one taught in English composition classes, it is done intentionally to achieve brevity and clear communication. Omitting the comma in simple series is the preferred guideline for Texas State communications such as periodicals, websites, brochures and other marketing materials, including advertisements, posters, direct mail pieces, etc. However, academic journals and other more formal documents might require use of the serial comma. It is acceptable to do so in those instances when using AP style would be inappropriate. Whichever style you follow, be sure to be consistent throughout your publication, document or suite of documents.
  • Adjectives: Use commas to separate a series of adjectives of equal rank: Enjoy this warm, sunny day.
  • Compound predicate: Don’t use a comma when there is a compound predicate, e.g., when the subject of the joined sentences is the same but it is not repeated in the second clause: The university offers many degree programs and is the site of various centers.
  • Conjunctions: Use a comma when a conjunction (and, but, or, yet, for, while or nor) joins two clauses that could stand alone as sentences. Don’t include a comma if the two sentences are very short.
  • Dates and places: Use commas to set off dates and places, after both the year (January 1, 1980, is his date of birth) and the state (Dallas, Texas, is where he was born).
  • Introductory clauses: Use a comma to set off long introductory phrases and clauses but not short ones.
  • Nonessential clauses: Use a comma before a clause starting with “which” but not before a clause starting with “that.” (“Which” usually introduces a nonessential clause, which is a bit of extra information like this that is not essential to the sentence’s meaning. “That” usually introduces an essential clause that includes information necessary to the sentence.
  • Quotation marks: Always place commas (and periods) inside quotation marks.
  • Titles: Use commas to set off an identification or title following a name: Sue Smith, director of the Office of Undergraduate Admissions, called the meeting.

committee

Do not abbreviate. Capitalize when part of a formal name: the House Appropriations Committee.
Do not capitalize committee in shortened versions of long committee names: the Special Senate Select Committee to Investigate Improper Labor-Management Practices, for example, became the rackets committee.

Common Experience

An annual, Texas State-wide program of themed speeches, films, exhibits, debates and other events designed to cultivate a common intellectual conversation, get students involved and foster a sense of community. Always put the year’s theme in quotation marks.

Commons Dining Hall

An all-you-care-to-eat dining facility located in Commons Hall.

comprise, compose

Comprise means to contain or to include all. The whole comprises the parts: The College of Liberal Arts comprises nine departments. Compose means to create or put together: The College of Liberal Arts is composed of nine departments.

contractions

Contractions listed in the dictionary are acceptable. Use them as appropriate for your audience, avoiding them in more formal communications.

couple of

Always use the “of.” Never use “a couple people” or something similar. Also, a phrase such as this takes a plural verb: A couple of people were at the table.

course names

Avoid including course numbers. Capitalize the important words when using the formal name of a course: Introduction to Creative Writing, Editing for Clear Communication. Do not capitalize if using the course’s informal name: a biology class.

course work

Two words. Not coursework.

credit-by-examination

Hyphenate this term.

Darren B. Casey Athletic Administration Complex

Named in 2008 for Texas State alumnus and benefactor Darren Casey, this facility is located on the corner of Charles Austin and Aquarena Springs drives. It is the base office for Texas State Athletics. The facility houses the internal and external operations of the department, including facilities, athletic marketing, media relations, compliance, the Bobcat Club and the business office.

dashes

  • Use a hyphen to join compound nouns: mother-in-law. Also use a hyphen to join two words to avoid confusion: small-businessman but healthcare center. When two or more words modify a noun and precede that noun, use a hyphen to link them: a well-known actor, a full-time job. Exception: Do not use a hyphen when the compound modifier includes the word “very” or ends in “-ly”: a very big university, a highly qualified professor. Some combinations that are hyphenated before a noun are not hyphenated when they appear after a noun: he works full time. However, the hyphen usually must be retained when the modifier occurs after a form of the verb “to be”: he is well-known.
  • Hyphen (-) or en dash (–) : Use either a hyphen or an en dash (one or the other within a document or suite of documents) to separate ranges of items, such as times, dates or quantities. (To make an en dash: In Microsoft Word, select Insert and then Symbol. Then choose Special Characters. Select en dash and Insert. On Mac keyboards, type option+dash to create an en dash.) Examples: There will be 30-50 people there. The event runs October 10–15. 6 a.m. – 9 a.m. (include a space before and after the hyphen or en dash in ranges of times). But if you use “from,” follow it with “to” rather than a dash: Check-in is from 9 a.m. to noon.
  • em dash (—): Use in place of commas to set off a section of the sentence that requires special emphasis. Place one space before and after the em dash. (In Microsoft Word, select Insert and then Symbol. Then choose Special Characters. Select em dash and Insert. On Mac keyboards, type option+shift+dash to create an em dash.) Example: The em-dash — a very important typographical element — should not be overused.

dates

  • Year alone: Years are expressed in numerals unless they begin the sentence: The year is 2013. Two thousand and eight was an important year. While the latter optional is acceptable, it is preferable to rewrite the sentence so the year can be expressed in numerals.
  • Year abbreviated: In informal contexts, the first two digits of a year can be replaced by an apostrophe (not an opening single quotation mark): the class of ’58 (not ‘58).
  • Academic year or ranges of years: Use 2007-08 or 2007-2008, but be consistent with the style you choose within your document or suite of documents.
  • Centuries: Lowercase and spell out numbers less than 10: the first century; the 19th century. For proper names, capitalize and/or follow the organization’s practice: Century 21 Realty; Twentieth Century Fund. Hyphenate only when the century forms a compound modifier: 18th-century architecture.
  • Decades: Use numerals to indicate decades of history. Use an apostrophe to indicate numerals that are left out; show plural by adding the letter s: the 1990s (not 1990’s); the Roaring ’20s.
  • Month and day: In most university communications, spell out the names of all months. Periodicals that follow AP style may choose to abbreviate the names of months when used with dates. Whether you abbreviate the names of months or not, be consistent throughout your document or suite of documents. Never add “nd,” “rd,” “st” or “th” to a date: Classes start August 20.
  • Month, day and year: Separate the date and year with a comma: September 1, 2008, or Sept. 1, 2008. Do not add “nd,” “rd,” “st” or “th” to the date. When a date appears in the middle of a sentence, follow the year with a comma: July 4, 1776, is Independence Day.
  • Month and year: Spell out the name of the month and do not include commas. Example: October 2008. 

daylight saving time  

Not daylight savings time. No “s” at the end of “saving” and no caps.

days of the week

Capitalize them and do not abbreviate, except when needed in tabular material. Tabular format is the first three letters: Mon, Tue, Wed; no periods. See also dates.

dean

Capitalize when used as a formal title before a name: Dean Jane Smith. Lowercase otherwise: Jane Smith, dean of the McCoy College of Business Administration. See also academic titles.

dean’s list

Should always be lowercased when used in a sentence.

decades

Use numerals to indicate decades of history. Use an apostrophe to indicate numerals that are left out; show plural by adding the letter s: the 1950s, the ’70s, the Roaring ’20s. See dates.

degrees, academic

See academic degrees.

Den, the

Located on the first floor of the Academic Services Building South, the Den is a food-court-style dining hall.

departments, academic

Capitalize names of academic departments when using the formal name (Department of Biology). Usage of the formal name is preferred, but if the order of the words in the formal name must be reversed, drop the “of” and retain the capitalization (the Biology Department). Lowercase, except for words that are proper nouns or adjectives, when referring to departments in a general way: one of the best biology departments; the English department. Formal names of Texas State University departments:

  • Department of Accounting
  • Department of Aerospace Studies
  • Department of Agriculture
  • Department of Anthropology
  • School of Art and Design
  • Department of Biology
  • Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry
  • Department of Communication Disorders
  • Department of Communication Studies
  • Department of Computer Information Systems and Quantitative Methods
  • Department of Computer Science
  • Department of Counseling, Leadership, Adult Education and School Psychology
  • School of Criminal Justice
  • Department of Curriculum and Instruction
  • Department of Engineering Technology
  • Department of English
  • Ingram School of Engineering (NEVER the Bruce and Gloria Ingram School of Engineering)
  • School of Family and Consumer Sciences
  • Department of Finance and Economics
  • Department of Geography
  • School of Health Administration
  • Department of Health and Human Performance
  • Department of Health Information Management
  • Department of History
  • School of Journalism and Mass Communication
  • Department of Management
  • Department of Marketing
  • Department of Mathematics
  • Department of Military Science
  • Department of Modern Languages
  • School of Music
  • St. David's School of Nursing
  • Department of Philosophy
  • Department of Physical Therapy
  • Department of Physics
  • Department of Political Science
  • Department of Psychology
  • Department of Respiratory Care
  • School of Social Work
  • Department of Sociology
  • Department of Theatre and Dance (note the -re spelling)

departments, nonacademic

Capitalize names of administrative and other departmental offices at Texas State when using the formal name (Office of Disability Services). Lowercase “office” when not using the formal name: The marketing office publishes these guidelines. Formal names of offices at Texas State University include:

  • Office of Audits and Analysis
  • Auxiliary Services
  • Bobcat Club
  • Budget Office
  • Campus Recreation
  • Career Services
  • Center for Professional Excellence
  • Counseling Center
  • Dean of Students Office
  • Department of Housing and Residential Life (DHRL on second reference)
  • Environmental Health, Safety and Risk Management
  • Financial Aid and Scholarships
  • General Accounting Office
  • Human Resources
  • Instructional Technologies Support
  • International Office
  • LBJ Student Center
  • Materials Management Department
  • Office of Athletic Academic Services
  • Office of Continuing Education
  • Office of Disability Services
  • Office of Distance and Extended Learning
  • Office of Equity and Access
  • Office of Facilities Planning, Design and Construction
  • Office of Institutional Research
  • Office of Media Relations
  • Office of the President
  • Office of the University Registrar
  • Office of Professional Development
  • Office of Research and Sponsored Programs
  • Office of Student Diversity and Inclusion
  • Office of Undergraduate Admissions
  • Office of University Marketing
  • Parking Services
  • Payroll Office
  • Purchasing Office
  • Student Business Services
  • Student Health Center
  • Technology Resources
  • Texas State Alumni Association
  • Texas State Athletics
  • Travel Office
  • University Planning and Assessment
  • University Police Department

different from

Not different than.

dimensions

Use numerals and spell out inches, feet, yards, etc. Hyphenate adjectival forms before nouns: the 17-foot-long trailer. The trailer was 17 feet long. The suspect was about 5 feet 6 inches tall. The 5-foot-6-inch man.

dining hall

Avoid “cafeteria.” Use “dining hall” (lowercased) or name the hall specifically: Commons Dining Hall, Harris Dining Hall, Jones Dining Center, the Lair Food Court and the Den.

directions

When writing directions to campus, abbreviate Interstate 35 as IH-35. Capitalize Exit and do not use # or number. Example: From IH-35 take Exit 206.

Lowercase east, west, north or south when used as a directional reference: Go south for the winter. Capitalize for a region: Central Texas, the West Coast, the Rio Grande Valley.

director

See titles.

disabilities

People are disabled, not handicapped, and buildings that accommodate them are accessible. Avoid constructions such as “the disabled.” “People with disabilities” is better.

dissociate

not disassociate

disciplines, academic

Do not capitalize the names of academic disciplines or major or minor areas of study, except those derived from proper nouns. When the name of the discipline is used as part of a title, such as that of a department, capitalization is necessary, but don’t use it when speaking of the discipline in general terms: I studied American history and English at Yale; Graduate students in biology must complete six hours of thesis or nonthesis research. Following are instructions for applying to the doctoral program in physical therapy.

divisions

The administration of Texas State University is divided into several divisions. Capitalize the names of these divisions, which include:

  • Academic Affairs
  • Finance and Support Services
  • Information Technology
  • Student Affairs
  • University Advancement

dormitory

Avoid this term; residence hall is the preferred term for on-campus university housing.

“Eat ’em up, Cats”

A sign made by holding up the right hand in the shape of a Bobcat paw that is usually made while saying, “Eat ’em up, Cats!”; use quotation marks around this term when referring to the hand signal and use an apostrophe, not an opening single quotation mark, before ’em.

Edwards Aquifer

There is no apostrophe in Edwards, and “Aquifer” should be capitalized.

Edwards Aquifer Research & Data Center (EARDC)

Located in the Freeman Aquatic Biology Building, this center provides a public service in the study, understanding and use of the Edwards Aquifer. EARDC is acceptable on second and subsequent references within a document.

effect/affect

Affect is always a verb: Your vote will affect the outcome. Effect is used mostly as a noun but is sometimes a verb: We aren’t sure what that effect will be, but we hope it will effect positive change.

e.g., i.e.

The abbreviation e.g. stands for exempli gratia, which means for example. The abbreviation i.e. stands for id est, which means that is or in other words. So e.g. is used to cite an example from a longer series, while i.e. clarifies exactly what is included in the series.

ellipsis (...)

Use three periods (no spaces between them, but a space on each side) to signify that something has been left out of a direct quote or that the writer is leaping from one topic to another. A complete sentence will have its own period, followed by a space, then the ellipsis, a space and then the next sentence.

email

No hyphen. Use a lowercase “e" unless it is at the beginning of a sentence or to be consistent with a capped headline style.

emeritus

One retired from professional life but permitted to retain as an honorary title the rank of the last office held. Emeritus status is not automatic; it is an honor conferred, usually upon retirement. Use the descriptor after the title. Examples: One person, by gender and placement: Professor Emeritus John Doe; Professor Emerita Mary Smith; Jane Doe, professor emerita. Multiples by gender: professors emeriti (for all men or mixed group); professors emeritae (for all women). Reference to all the faculty and staff who hold emeritus status is, simply, “the emeriti.” Note: At Texas State, a woman may choose either professor emerita or professor emeritus as her title; follow a person's preference.

Emerging Research University

This is classification is awarded by the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board. Texas State was classified as an Emerging Research University in 2012. Capitalize each word.

End Zone Complex

Located in the south end zone of Bobcat Stadium. It is home to Bobcat football. Capitalize each word of this formal name.

Engineering, School of

Always use Ingram School of Engineering. It is part of the College of Science and Engineering.

English as a second language

Capitalize only “English.” ESL is acceptable on second and subsequent references within a document.

ensure, insure

“Ensure” means to assure or guarantee. “Insure” means to protect against risk or loss with insurance.

entitled

Use it to mean a right to do or have something. Do not use it to mean titled.

every day, everyday

Every day is an adverb: I study every day. Everyday is an adjective: I wore my everyday shoes.

exit

Capitalize Exit when using with directions: From IH-35 take Exit 206.

faculty

Faculty can be singular or plural. If you are uncomfortable using faculty as a plural noun, you can use faculty members.

farther, further

“Farther” refers to physical distance: We walked farther today than we did yesterday.
“Further” refers to an extension of time or degree: We need to look into this further.

fax

Fax is short for facsimile and is not an acronym. It should not be in all caps. But use fax, not facsimile.

federal

Capitalized only when used with the complete name of a government agency or a business: Federal Trade Commission, Federal Express. Otherwise use lowercase: federal government.

fewer, less

Use “fewer” for individual items: Fewer than 100 people attended. Use “less” for bulk or quantity: My new car uses less gas.

flier

Not “flyer,” when referring to a handbill or an aviator. “Flyer” is the proper name for some trains and buses.

Fighting Stallions

The Fighting Stallions is the formal name (note the italics) of the statue that presides over the western end of the Quad and has been a landmark on campus since 1952. The statue was donated to the university by well-known American sculptor Anna Hyatt Huntington (1876–1973) and her husband. In the early 1970s, the 17-foot-tall statue was the focal point of the campus free speech zone, and it remains a student gathering spot today. 

Financial Aid and Scholarships

This is the official name of the university’s financial aid office. Note that office is not part of the official name, so when used with this phrase, “office” should not be capitalized.

Fire Station Studios

This former city hall/fire station, built in 1915, was purchased and restored by attorney Anthony “Lucky” Tomblin in 1984. Texas State purchased the recording studio from Tomblin in 1993 and established the first sound recording technology program in higher education in the Southwest.

first-come, first-served; first come, first served

The term gets hyphens when used as a modifier before a noun but no hyphens when used after a noun: There will be food served on a first-come, first-served basis. It is first come, first served.

fiscal year

A 12-month period used for bookkeeping. The fiscal year for the state of Texas and Texas State begins September 1 and ends August 31.

forego, forgo

Forego means to go before. Forgo means to abstain from.

forms

Do not capitalize the titles of forms or informal documents: exemption request form, housing contract, leave request, etc.

forward, afterward, backward, toward

No final “s” is needed.

fractions

Spell out amounts less than one in stories, using hyphens between the words: two-thirds, four-fifths, etc. Use figures for precise amounts larger than one, converting to decimals whenever practical. But use a forward slash in the fraction: 1 2/3, 3 4/7, etc.

fraternity

Acceptable on all references. Do not refer to them as frats or their members as boys.

Freeman Center

Harold M. Freeman donated this ranch, located north of San Marcos on Ranch Road 12, to the university in 1981. The Freeman Center serves as an educational laboratory where classes are taught and faculty and students conduct research.

free-speech zone

The area on the Quad between Evans and Derrick halls by the Fighting Stallions statue. In this area, students may play music, set up booths and tables, and protest.

freshman

Terms denoting student classification are lowercased and never abbreviated. Use freshman when referring to one first-year student, freshmen when writing of more than one. Use freshman (singular) as a modifier: That is generally considered a freshman course. She lives in the freshman dorm with 400 other freshmen.

full time, full-time

Hyphenate only when used as a compound modifier: He works full time. She has a full-time job.

fundraiser, fundraising

Both are always one word.

GPA, grade point average

Either is acceptable, just be consistent within your document or suite of documents.

gaillardia

The name of the official school flower, also known as Indian blanket. This wildflower grows in most parts of Texas and is sometimes known as the Mexican blanket. Its color is maroon and gold, which are also Texas State’s school colors. The names of plants and flowers should be lowercased, except for words that are proper nouns.

Gaillardian Award

Established in 1925 by the editors of The Pedagog to honor outstanding and accomplished students. At halftime of the homecoming football game each year, the award is given to 12 students. The name of the award was derived from the gaillardia, the official school flower.

Gallery of the Common Experience

A rotating art exhibit housed in the Honors Coffee Forum in the Lampasas Building that is part of Texas State's annual Common Experience program.

gender-neutral language

Make your writing as inclusive and gender-neutral as possible when representing Texas State or its programs or services. To make your language inclusive: Use the second person (you and your): You have many options when choosing your major. Or, use plural nouns and pronouns. If you choose this option, be sure to change verbs and other nouns and pronouns as needed: Students have many options when choosing their majors. Avoid the awkward “he or she” or “his or her” construction whenever possible.

glass-bottom boats

Operated by The Meadows Center for Water and the Environment to allow visitors to tour Spring Lake.

Glade Theatre

An outdoor theatre located on West Campus next to Blanco Hall. See also theatre/theater.

“Go Bobcats”

The name of the Texas State fight song; use quotation marks around the names of songs.

grades

Use the capital letters A, B, C, WP, etc., with no quotation marks. No apostrophe is required in the plural: He made two As and two WPs.

graduate

A graduate is an alumnus or alumna. A graduate student is working toward an advanced degree beyond the bachelor’s. Someone who attended the university but did not graduate is a former student.

The Graduate College

Always use "The" capitalized when writing about The Graduate College at Texas State.

graduate from

Always use the “from”: He graduated from Texas State in 2012. Wrong: “He graduated Texas State in 2012.” Also avoid the passive “He was graduated from Texas State in 2012.”

Graduate House

The formal name of the body within Student Government made up of representatives of all graduate students at Texas State University, as selected by each college dean.

GRE

Don’t spell out the full name of this entrance examination, even on first reference. It is widely known. (This also applies to ACT, SAT, GMAT, etc.) Use Arabic numerals in constructions such as SAT-1. Use figures for ACT, SAT and similar test scores. Do not add commas to SAT or other scores that reach into the thousands: His SAT score was 1200. Her GRE composite score was 2070.

Guardian Club

This club’s members are individuals who have included Texas State in their estate plans. Deferred or planned gifts are arranged during people’s lifetimes and are given to the university usually after the donors’ deaths or the deaths of their beneficiaries.

Harris Dining Hall

An all-you-care-to-eat dining facility located in West Campus. It was named to honor Thomas Green Harris, the first president of Southwest Texas Normal School (1903 – 1911).

head up

People do not “head up” committees; they head them.

healthcare

Use healthcare as a noun or adjective. The university's style differs from Merriam Webster's Collegiate Dictionary on this entry.

“Heart of Texas State” 

A sign made by holding up the left hand in the shape of the state of Texas with the two outside fingers pointing down toward the palm to indicate the location of the university; use quotation marks around this term when using it to describe the hand signal.

height

Use figures: The man was 5 feet 5 inches tall; the 6-feet-5-inch man. See dimensions.

Hillviews

The university magazine; italicize the name.

hip-hop

Hyphenate as a noun or adjective.

Hispanic

This is a broad term for people from Spanish-speaking countries. Use only when the country of origin is unknown. Otherwise, be specific: Spanish, Mexican, Puerto Rican, Peruvian, etc.

Hispanic-Serving Institution

Use HSI on second reference. Texas State received recognition as a Hispanic-Serving Institution in 2011. To receive the HSI designation, an institution must have an enrollment of undergraduate full-time equivalent students that is at least 25 percent Hispanic. The designation makes Texas State eligible to apply for grants that expand opportunities and academic offerings for all students.

historic/historical

“Historic” means important, momentous or history-making. A historic meeting will take place on Tuesday. “Historical” refers to any event in the past.

Homecoming

Capitalize when referring to Texas State Homecoming. Lowercase otherwise.

home page

Two words, lowercased.

Honors College

Formerly the University Honors Program.

Honors Coffee Forum

A study lounge, coffeehouse and art gallery located in the Lampasas Building on the Texas State campus.

hopefully

This is an adverb that means “with hope.” It is a mistake to use it to mean “I hope” or “it is to be hoped.”

http://

Don’t include http:// in a URL when it is clear that it’s a web address. Browsers don’t require that it be entered; it’s easier for the reader to remember a URL without it; and eliminating it can make it easier to fit the URL on a single line.

hyphen (-)

See dashes.

ID

No periods: Texas State ID card.

IQ

Acceptable on all references for “intelligence quotient.”

important/importantly

Use “important” with “more” or “most” rather than “importantly”: Most important, we have a plan for the future.

Inc. or Ltd.

Abbreviate incorporated or limited when used following a business name.

in regard to

Not “in regards to.” Better yet, just use “regarding.”

Ingram School of Engineering

Part of the College of Science and Engineering; NEVER the Bruce and Gloria Ingram School of Engineering.

in-state, out-of-state

Hyphenate when used as a modifier before a noun. However, use “Texas resident” or “nonresident” to describe these types of tuition rates at Texas State.

Institutes, Texas State

Capitalize names of institutes at Texas State when using the formal name. Lowercase “institute” when not using the formal name: The institute is the best on campus.
Formal names of institutes at Texas State University include:

  • Institute for Global Business
  • Institute for Government Innovation
  • Institute for the Study of Invasive Species
  • LBJ Institute for STEM Education and Research
  • Richter Research Institute
  • The Education Institute

insure, ensure

Insure means to protect against risk or loss with insurance. Ensure means to assure or guarantee.

international students

Not foreign students.

internet

Lowercase unless used at the beginning of a sentence.

it’s, its

“It’s” is the contraction of it is: It’s time to go. “Its” is the possessive form of it: The university is proud of its history.

Jim Wacker Field at Bobcat Stadium

The official name of the field inside Texas State’s 30,000-seat football stadium. In November 2003, the field was renamed Jim Wacker Field in honor of the former football coach who died that year. Capitalize as shown.

job titles

Titles of persons holding offices such as those listed below are rarely used before names as part of the names, often because of their length. Preferred usage is to lowercase occupational titles and use commas to set them off following names. Note the capitalization and format of the following examples:

  • the vice president; Sue Jones, vice president for Finance and Support Services
  • the associate vice president; John Williams, associate vice president for Enrollment Management and Marketing
  • the director; Jane Smith, director of University Marketing
  • the registrar; Jim Williams, registrar
  • the chief executive officer; John Doe, the chief operating officer of XYZ Corporation

Jones Dining Center

A dining facility on the Texas State campus named to honor Billy Mac Jones, the fifth university president (1969 – 1973).

Jowers Center

Texas State’s athletic complex, located next to Strahan Coliseum. It was named to honor Milton Jowers, the school’s basketball coach from 1946 to 1961.

judgment

Not judgement.

junior

Terms denoting student classification are lowercased and never abbreviated.

kick off, kickoff

Use kick off as a verb; use kickoff as a noun or adjective.

KTSW

Texas State’s student radio station (89.9 FM). Capitalize as shown and identify as a radio station.

Lair, the

A food-court-style dining facility located in the LBJ Student Center.

lay, lie

“Lay” is an action word. It takes a direct object: Please lay the book on the table. “Laid” is the form for its past tense and its past participle: She laid/had laid the book on the table. Its present participle is “laying”: She is laying the book on the table. “Lie” indicates a state of reclining along a horizontal plane. It does not take a direct object: Please lie down on the floor. Its past tense is “lay”: He lay down on the floor. Its past participle is “lain”: He had lain on the floor. Its present participle is ‘lying’: He is lying on the floor. When “lie” means to make an untrue statement, the verb forms are lie, lied, lying.

LBJ Student Center

LBJ Student Center is the full name of this building, named to honor Lyndon Baines Johnson, the 36th president of the United States who graduated from the university in 1930. LBJSC or “the student center” is acceptable on second and subsequent references. The university’s Welcome Center is located within the student center.

legislature

Capitalize when preceded by the name of a state. Retain capitalization when the state name is dropped but the reference is specifically to that state’s legislature.

lend, loan

“Lend” is a verb: Please lend me your book. “Loan” is a noun: I got a loan from the bank.

less than, fewer than

Use “less” for bulk or quantity: My car uses less gas than yours does. Use “fewer” for individual items or people: There are fewer people here today.

Living-Learning Communities

A living-learning community is a group of students living together based on a common interest, while taking one or more classes together.

log in, log on, login, logon

“Log in” and “log on” are verbs; login, logon and logoff are nouns: You must log in using your login. Log on to the website. People log in to, but they don’t log onto or log into.

long-term

Always hyphenate this adjective.

loose, lose

“Loose” is an adjective: My tooth is loose. “Lose” is a verb: Don’t lose your lunch money.

-ly words

Do not use a hyphen between adverbs ending in -ly and the adjectives they modify: an easily remembered name, a badly injured person.

magazine names

See capitalization and titles.

manikin

Preferred spelling; used when writing about the St. David's School of Nursing.

mariachi

Lower case when writing in general about the music, a band or a musician. Capitalize when used with a specific band or event: Feria del Mariachi, Mariachi Vargas.

Maroon & Gold Room

A hospitality room in Strahan Coliseum where pre-game events, halftime receptions and other special events are held.

Mathworks, Texas

A program that develops model programs, including summer math camps, to engage K-12 students in high-level mathematics.

Meadows Center for Water and the Environment, The

Known for decades as Aquarena Springs Resort, this property came under the stewardship of Texas State University in the mid-1990s. Now known as The Meadows Center for Water and the Environment, the focus is on developing and promoting programs and techniques for ensuring sustainable water resources for human needs, ecosystem health and economic development.

measurements

See dimensions.

memento

Not momento

metropolitan area

Capitalize Austin Metropolitan Area. San Marcos is part of the Austin Metropolitan Area as defined by the Office of Management and Budget.

midterm

No hyphen is needed when used as a noun or an adjective.

military units

These are capitalized when referring to the forces of the United States, such as U.S. Army or Air Force. Don’t capitalize informal references such as military science. ROTC stands for Reserve Officers’ Training Corps, but the abbreviation ROTC is acceptable in all references to this program. Use Air Force ROTC (AFROTC on second reference) when referring to Texas State’s aerospace studies program and Army ROTC (AROTC on second reference) when referring to the university’s military science program.

Bill Miller Room

A room located on the west concourse of Bobcat Stadium.

minuscule

Not miniscule

money

  • Use $ and figures for all amounts in excess of 99 cents. Do not use a decimal and zeroes for whole-dollar amounts. Example: The book costs $14.
  • Spell out cents in amounts less than $1. Example: The hamburger costs 99 cents.
  • For amounts of more than $1 million, use the $ and numerals up to two decimal places: Example: a $4.2 million budget, a $1 million donation 

months

  • Always capitalize the names of months.
  • When a month is used with a specific date, abbreviate Jan., Feb. Aug., Sept. Oct., Nov. and Dec.: She was born on Jan. 5, 1980.
  • Spell out all names of months when using alone or when using with a year but not a date: I'm going on vacation in September. President Kennedy was assassinated in November 1963.
  • When a sentence uses a month and a year, do not separate them with a comma

more than, over

Acceptable in all uses to indicate greater numerical value.

multi-racial

Use hyphenated

names

Use last name only on second and subsequent references. As a general rule, spell and punctuate people’s names the way they prefer them to appear. Don’t use spaces between initials. Terms such as Jr., Sr., II, III are not set off by commas when used in a name unless the person prefers that the comma be included.

nationalities and races

Capitalize the proper names of nationalities, peoples, race, tribes, etc.: Arab, American, Japanese, Jewish, Nordic, Sioux, etc. Lowercase black, white, etc. Do not use “colored.” See African-American, black and Hispanic.

NCAA (The National Collegiate Athletic Association)

NCAA is acceptable on first reference. Texas State is in Division I in all sports. The Bobcats play football in the NCAA's Football Bowl Subdivision.

New Student Orientation

The preferred term, rather than freshman orientation or transfer orientation, for these Texas State programs: New Student Orientation for freshmen or New Student Orientation for transfer students. Capitalize first letters of each word when referring to the specific Texas State event. Do not capitalize when talking about such events in a general sense: Many universities hold new student orientations.

No.

Use as the abbreviation for “number” in conjunction with a figure to indicate position or rank: No. 1 choice.

nonemergency

No hyphen.

nonprofit

No hyphen.

nonresident

No hyphen.

nontraditional students

No hyphen. The term applies to anyone who did not go directly from high school to Texas State. Nontraditional can apply to anyone who transferred from another school, went to a community college first or took time off, for example. Avoid use of this label unless it is essential to the clarity of the communication.

numerals

  • Generally, spell out numbers less than 10. Use the Arabic numeral for 10 and larger numbers, except at the beginning of a sentence. For 999 and larger, include commas where appropriate: 1,000 or 100,000.
  • Use “No.” as the abbreviation for “number” in conjunction with a figure to indicate position or rank: No. 1 choice.
  • Ordinals: Spell out first through ninth when they indicate sequence in time or location: first base, second in line, third floor. Use numerals for 10th and above: 11th grade. Use 1st, 2nd, 3rd, 4th, etc. when the sequence has been assigned in forming names. The principal examples are geographic, military and political designations such as 1st Ward, 7th Fleet and 1st Sgt.
  • Large numbers: For millions, billions, etc., use figures and the word: 1 million, 2.5 billion. When large numbers must be spelled out, use a hyphen to connect a word ending in y to another word; do not use commas between other separate words that are part of one number: twenty-one; one hundred forty-three; one thousand one hundred fifty-five.
  • Casual uses: Spell out casual expressions such as a thousand times no, thanks a million, he walked a quarter of a mile.

Nursing, School of

Always use St. David's School of Nursing. Part of the College of Health Professions.

off campus, on campus

Hyphenate when using as an adjective, but not as an adverb. Examples: I want to live off campus. The club will have an on-campus meeting.

OK, OK’d, OK’ing, OKs

Do not use “okay.”

Old Main

This building was the first classroom building at Southwest Texas State Normal College.

on

Do not use “on” before a date or day of the week when its absence would not lead to confusion: New Student Orientation is July 16.

online

Not on-line.

Outdoor Center

The headquarters for the Outdoor Recreation Program at Texas State. This center houses equipment rentals and reservations for University Camp and the Adventure Trip Program.

over, more than

Acceptable in all uses to indicate greater numerical value.

paintings

Names of paintings should be italicized: The Monarch of the Hill Country by Clemente Guzman; Leonardo da Vinci’s Mona Lisa.

Panhellenic Council, Pan-hellenic Council

These are two different groups at Texas State. Double-check which one is correct when you encounter it in text.

Patti Strickel Harrison Theatre

Note spelling and capitalization. Located in the Performing Arts Center, which opened in February 2014.

Paws-n-Go

A small, on-campus convenience store located near the Evans Liberal Arts building.

Pedagog

The Pedagog was the official yearbook of the university. It was the oldest tradition, and it recorded the first year of the school’s existence. In 1975, when most colleges and universities were phasing out their yearbooks, the university administration dropped the Pedagog. It was reinstated in 1984 then discontinued in 1999.

Pell Grant

Capitalize in all references.

percentages

  • Write out the word “percent” in text. Use the symbol “%” only in charts or tables.
  • Use numerals for percentages, except at the beginning of a sentence: 1 percent, 2.5 percent (use decimals, not fractions), 10 percent.
  • For amounts less than 1 percent, precede the decimal with a zero: The cost of living rose 0.6 percent.
  • Repeat the word “percent” with each individual figure: He said 10 percent to 30 percent of the electorate may not vote.
  • Percentages take singular verbs when standing alone or when a singular word follows an “of” construction: The teacher said 60 percent was a failing grade. He said 50 percent of the membership was there.
  • Percentages take plural verbs when a plural word follows an “of” construction: He said 50 percent of the members were there.

Performing Arts Center

Opened in February 2014. Capitalize all three words. Contains the Patti Strickel Harrison Theatre and the Recital Hall.

Persona

Texas State’s official literary magazine, sponsored by the Department of English. Capitalize and italicize its name.

Ph.D.

The preferred form is to say a person holds a doctorate or doctoral degree and name the individual’s area of specialty. See academic degrees.

p.m., a.m.

Lowercase with periods. Avoid the redundant 9 p.m. tonight or 10 a.m. in the morning.

poetry

Names of poems are placed in quotation marks. See capitalization and titles.

possessive

To form the possessive of singular nouns, add ’s. To form the possessive of plural or proper nouns that end in "s," add only the apostrophe:

  •     Bob’s bicycle is green. (singular possessive)
  •     The girls’ haircuts were alike. (plural possessive)
  •     Mark Jones’ minivan broke down, so Mike Hunter's truck saved the day. (proper nouns, singular possessive)
  •     The Joneses’ garage door wouldn’t open. (plural possessive)

A few irregular plural nouns take ’s to form the possessive:

  •    We cleaned the children’s rooms.
  •    The media’s coverage of the event was sensational.

Never put an apostrophe in these pronouns that are already possessive: its, hers, yours, ours, whose.

The genitive case (indicating a possessor or source) also requires the ’s or s’ construction:

  •     You need 36 hours’ credit to graduate.
  •     For the independent study, he earned one hour’s credit.
  •     Dr. Roberts has 20 years’ experience in the field of robotics.
  •     The company gave her three weeks’ pay in advance.

An attributive noun (a noun acting as an adjective modifying another noun) doesn’t require the ’s or s’:

  •     Founders Day
  •     Parents Association
  •     Parents Weekend
  •     Department of Veterans Affairs

post-

Hyphenate when used with a word to mean after: post-game, post-graduate, post-election. Do not hyphenate with other uses: post office.

presently/currently

“Presently" means in a little while or soon. "Currently" means now. In most cases you don’t need to use currently. “We are revising the plan” is better than “We are currently revising the plan.”

president

Capitalize before a name: President Jane Smith. But lowercase elsewhere: Dr. Jane Smith, president of Texas State University; the president of the university. See academic titles.

President’s House

The name of the official residence of the president of Texas State University. Capitalize both words.

problem solving/problem-solving

Two words as a noun; hyphenated as a compound adjective: problem-solving skills.

professor

See academic titles.

programs, academic

Try not to use program in place of major or department. Program often implies a separate administration or faculty. When describing a student’s activities, it may be best to use department, major or degree program rather than simply program.

Capitalize the word “program” only when part of a formal name. Following are the formal names of some Texas State programs:

  • Air Force Reserve Officer Training Corps (Air Force ROTC; AFROTC)
  • Army Reserve Office Training Corps (Army ROTC; AROTC)
  • Musical Theatre Program
  • Program of Health Information Management

program, event

For names of speakers or presenters listed on an event program, use the full name and title on first reference and the full name only in subsequent references.

Quad

The tree-lined mall near the center of the Texas State campus: Students often pass through the Quad on their way to class.

quotation marks

Periods and commas always go within the quotation marks; dashes, colons, semicolons and question marks go within the quotes when they apply to the quoted matter and outside when they apply to the whole sentence.

ratios

Use figures and hyphens: A 2-to-1 majority.

renowned

Not reknowned. “Renown” means well-known: He is a renowned expert in physics. There is no such word as reknowned.

residence halls

The preferred term for on-campus university housing; avoid using dormitory or dorm.

Residence Hall Association

The supervising body of Texas State residence halls. RHA is acceptable on second and subsequent references.

resident assistant

Not residence assistant. RA is acceptable on second and subsequent references. See titles.

résumé

Note the accent marks over the e’s. Follow these simple steps to replace the regular e’s with the proper symbols: In Microsoft Word, select Insert and then Symbol. Then choose Symbols and highlight the e with the correct accent mark. Select Insert. (Or search for "symbols" or "special characters" in your wordprocessing program's help index.)

the rising star of Texas

This is Texas State’s wordmark; in running text, capitalize only Texas and do not enclose in quotation marks.

room numbers

Use the following form when referring to rooms in buildings: Building, Room Number.
Example: Old Main, Room 102; Evans Liberal Arts building, Room 102.

River Systems Institute at Texas State University

The name was changed in 2012 to The Meadows Center for Water and the Environment. Do not use River Systems Institute.

Round Rock Campus

Formerly the Round Rock Higher Education Center. Capitalize all words of the formal name: Texas State Round Rock Campus. Use Round Rock Campus on second reference. Students at the Round Rock Campus can earn bachelor’s and master’s degrees and certificates in many subject areas. Located north of Austin in Round Rock, the campus opened in 2005.

Sac-N-Pac Room

A room in the End Zone Complex where meetings and special events are held.

San Marcos Springs

The springs are the headwaters of the San Marcos River. Texas State is the only campus in Texas on which a river begins and flows. The small dam below Saltgrass Steak House was built in 1849 by General Edward Burleson, one of the founders of San Marcos and a hero of the Texas Revolution, to power a gristmill. The springs are on the Balcones Fault Zone.

SAT

Don’t spell out the full name of this entrance examination, even on first reference. It is widely known. (This also applies to ACT, GMAT, GRE, etc.) Use Arabic numerals in constructions such as SAT-1. Use figures for ACT, SAT and similar test scores. Do not add commas to SAT or other scores that reach into the thousands: His SAT score was 1200. Her GRE composite score was 2070.

scholarships, fellowships

Capitalize only those words that are part of the full official name of a scholarship or fellowship. The word “scholarship” or “fellowship” may or may not be included in the name. Following are some examples of well-known scholarships and fellowships:

  • Rhodes Scholarship, Rhodes Scholar
  • Fulbright Scholarship, Fulbright Scholar
  • Graduate Council Fellowship, Graduate Council Fellow
  • Truman Scholarship, Truman Scholar

Names of Texas State scholarships include:

  • Emmett and Miriam McCoy Scholarship of Distinction (McCoy Scholarship of Distinction is acceptable on second reference.)
  • Emmett and Miriam McCoy Scholarship of Excellence (McCoy Scholarship of Excellence is acceptable on second reference.)
  • Emmie Craddock Scholarship
  • Lone Star Scholarship
  • National Hispanic Scholarship
  • National Merit Scholarship
  • President’s Honor Scholarship
  • Terry Foundation Scholarship
  • Texas State Achievement Scholarship
  • University Scholars (Refer to it as the University Scholars award.)

The official names of other university scholarships should be double-checked with the Financial Aid and Scholarships office or with the department, college or other entity that handles the scholarship program.

school

Several academic departments at Texas State carry the designation of “school.” Their names should be written as follows:

  • School of Art and Design
  • School of Criminal Justice
  • Ingram School of Engineering
  • School of Family and Consumer Sciences
  • School of Health Administration
  • School of Journalism and Mass Communication
  • School of Music
  • St. David's School of Nursing
  • School of Social Work

Lowercase “school” in other uses, such as graduate school.

St. David's School of Nursing

Opened in fall 2010; located at the Texas State Round Rock Campus.

Science, Technology, and Advanced Research (STAR) Park

Spell out on first reference and in headlines. Use STAR Park on second reference.

seasons/semester

Lowercase fall, spring, summer and winter in all uses. For a semester, do not add “of”: fall 2006 semester, not fall of 2006 semester.

senior

Terms denoting student classification are lowercased and never abbreviated.

Sessom Drive

Not Sessoms (no “s” at the end) Drive or Street. See also addresses.

Sewell Park

Originally Riverside Park, this park next to Strahan Coliseum was renamed in 1946 to honor mathematics professor S.M. Sewell. In 1916, Sewell led the campaign to clean the river and create the park.

sign-up, sign up

Hyphenate when used as a noun or an adjective: sign-up sheet. Do not hyphenate when used as a verb: I’ll sign up tomorrow.

since, because

Use “since” to note a time element: He has been sick since Tuesday. Use “because” to note a cause-effect relationship: He went because he was told he would get extra credit for the class.

smartphone

All one word. All lowercase unless used at the beginning of a sentence: Smartphones are becoming more and more common. Just about everyone has a smartphone.

soccer

See Bobcat Soccer Complex.

softball

See Bobcat Softball Stadium.

song titles

Place in quotation marks. See also titles.

sophomore

Terms denoting student classification are lowercased and never abbreviated.

sororities

Do not refer to sorority members as girls. Use "women" or "sorority members."

spring break

Do not capitalize.

Spring Lake

In 1849 General Edward Burleson built a dam to power a gristmill, thus forming Spring Lake. Spring Lake is home to The Meadows Center for Water and the Environment.

Square, the

San Marcos’ courthouse square. Students and San Marcos residents commonly refer to this area as “the Square,” so it is acceptable to capitalize it with a lowercase “the” preceding it. See capitalization.

St. David's School of Nursing

Always use the full name. Part of the College of Health Professions.

startup

One word when used as a noun or an adjective to describe a new business venture.

state names

Spell out state names when standing alone or used in conjunction with a city, town, village or military base. If abbreviations are required for lists or tabular material, use the following AP Style abbreviations: Ala., Alaska, Ariz., Ark., Calif., Colo., Conn., Del., Fla., Ga., Hawaii, Idaho, Ill., Ind., Iowa, Kan., Ky., La., Maine, Md., Mass., Mich., Minn., Miss., Mo., Mont. Neb., Nev., N.H., N.J., N.M., N.Y., N.C., N.D., Ohio, Okla., Ore., Pa., R.I., S.C., S.D., Tenn., Texas, Utah, Vt., Va., Wash., W. Va., Wis., Wyo.

Use the two-letter postal abbreviations only with full addresses, including ZIP code.

Place one comma between the city and the state name, and another comma after the state name, unless ending the sentence.

statewide

No hyphen.

Strahan Coliseum

The university’s 7,200-seat gymnasium. The name is pronounced "Stran" (rhymes with "bran"). The gymnasium is named to honor Oscar W. Strahan, who was instrumental in the building of the university's first gym. He served as athletic director at Texas State for 42 years, from 1919 to 1961. He coached football, basketball, and track and field.

streets

The proper spellings for names of streets adjacent to the Texas State University campus are provided below for your reference.

  • Academy Street
  • Aquarena Springs Drive/Loop 82
  • C.M. Allen Parkway
  • North Comanche Street
  • Concho Street
  • County Road 173 (to University Camp)
  • Edward G. Gary Street — Edward Gary Street is also an acceptable reference.
  • Edward J.L. Green Drive — Edward Green Drive is also an acceptable reference.
  • Elm Street
  • North Fredericksburg Street
  • South Fredericksburg Street
  • North Guadalupe Street
  • South Guadalupe Street
  • Hill House Circle
  • West Holland Street
  • James Street
  • Lindsey Street
  • Liveoak Street
  • Llano Circle
  • Lueders Court
  • North LBJ Drive
  • South LBJ Drive
  • Matthews Street
  • Moon Street
  • Moore Street (Ranch Road 12)
  • North Street
  • Old Main Drive
  • Pecan Street
  • Peques Street
  • Pickard Street
  • Pleasant Street
  • Ranch Road 12
  • Russell Circle
  • Sessom Drive (not Sessoms)
  • Smith Drive
  • State Street
  • Student Center Drive
  • Talbot Street
  • Texas Highway 21 (Horticulture Center/Traffic and Safety Center)
  • Tomás Rivera
  • University Drive
  • Vista Street
  • West Woods Street
  • Woods Street

Strutters

The name of the Texas State dance team.

student-athlete

Hyphenate this term.

Student Association for Campus Activities

SACA is acceptable on second and subsequent references.

student body president

Always spelled out, never an acronym or abbreviated. Capitalized before name: President John Smith. Otherwise in all lower case. The student body president is the elected representative of all students and chief executive officer of the Student Government.

student body vice president

Always spelled out, never an acronym or abbreviated. Capitalized before name: Vice President Jane Smith. Otherwise in all lower case. The student body vice president is an elected representative of all students and chair of the Student Senate and Graduate House.

Student Government

Always spelled out, never an acronym or abbreviated. Student Government is the body comprised of Senators and Graduate Representatives elected or selected to represent the student body of Texas State University and provide the programs and services it finds important to students.

Student Health Center

On second or subsequent reference, “health center” or “the center” is acceptable.

Student Learning Assistance Center

On second or subsequent reference, SLAC is acceptable. See also Supplemental Instruction below.

Student Recreation Center

“SRC” is acceptable on second reference and subsequent references. In informal communications, “the rec center” is also acceptable on second reference.

Student Senate

The formal name of the body within Student Government made up of the elected representatives of all students at Texas State University.

study-abroad, study abroad

Hyphenate when used as an adjective: a study-abroad program. Use as two words when it is a verb: She plans to study abroad.

Sun Belt Conference

Texas State Athletics is in NCAA Division I and a member of the Sun Belt Conference.

SuperCat

The name of the university's athletic logo featuring the Bobcat head.

Supplemental Instruction

A trademarked, copyrighted name for a tutoring program offered by the Student Learning Assistance Center. Both words must be capitalized.

T. Paul Bulmahn Research & Trading Lab

The computer lab in McCoy Hall used by business students to experience real trading and investing. It was funded by a $1.5 million donation by alumnus T. Paul Bulmahn, chairman and president of ATP Oil & Gas Corp.

teachers college

No apostrophe is needed in "teachers" in this usage because there is no possessive meaning.

telephone numbers

Separate each series of numbers with a period: 555.555.5555. (This is a deviation from AP style.) Do not use “1” before long-distance or toll-free numbers: 800.555.5555.

Tennis Complex

This facility is home to Texas State's varsity women's tennis team and is located on Sessom Drive across from the J.C. Kellam Administration building.

Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL)

TOEFL is acceptable on second reference.

Testing, Research-Support, and Evaluation Center (TREC)

Write out the full name of the center on first reference. Use TREC on subsequent references without "the" before the letters: TREC is a center that administers tests and maintains information on the credits by examinations, institutional and other examinations. In materials with a student audience, on first reference use "Testing Center (Testing, Research-Support, and Evaluation Center "TREC")" and then just "Testing Center" on subsequent references. When citing the center's location in an address or other listing, use "Commons Hall, First Floor."

Texas Mathworks

A program that develops model programs, including summer math camps, to engage K-12 students in high-level mathematics.

Texas State University, TXST

Use Texas State University on first reference. Texas State or TXST may be used on second reference or in headlines for variety or when space does not permit the use of the full name. Always uppercase all letters of TXST. 
 
Never use TSU. 
 
For guidance on how to use TXST on social media, see our Social Media Style Guide.

Texas State University System Board of Regents, The

See Board of Regents.

Thanksgiving break

Capitalize only Thanksgiving.

that, which

“That” is used to introduce an essential clause (one that cannot be eliminated without changing the meaning): This is the restaurant that I told you about. Use “which” to introduce a nonessential clause: We ate at the new restaurant, which had received a good review in the newspaper. An essential clause must not be set off from the rest of the sentence by commas; a nonessential clause must.

that, who

Use “that” when referring to inanimate objects or animals. Use “who” when referring to people.

theatre/theater

Either spelling is acceptable, but use of one or the other should be consistent throughout your document or suite of documents. In formal names, take care to use the spelling used by the entity: Texas State’s Department of Theatre and Dance; the Glade Theatre; Theatre Center; but LBJ Student Center Teaching Theater and Alkek Teaching Theater.

Theatre Center

This building, easily recognized for its drum shape, is located on Moon Street. It houses several classrooms, lecture/recital teaching theatres, a studio theatre, a full costume and scene shop, and a main theatre.

times

a.m. and p.m. are used lowercase with periods in both lists and sentences. Do not use :00 for times on the hour. Examples: 5 p.m. or 5:30 a.m. To avoid confusion, use noon and midnight instead of 12 p.m. and 12 a.m. Do not use 12 noon or 12 midnight. See also a.m., p.m.

titles

  • The university’s style for titles follows AP style. Capitalize a formal title used directly before a name. Lowercase and use commas to set off a title following a name. Lowercase and spell out titles when not used with names. Do not capitalize job titles such as officer, assistant or accountant when used before a name.
  • In formal contexts as opposed to running text, such as a displayed list of names and titles in an annual report, titles are usually capitalized even when following a name. Exceptions may also be called for in promotional or other contexts for reasons of courtesy or politics, as long as capitalization is handled consistently within a document or suite of documents. A title used alone, in place of a personal name, is capitalized only in such contexts as a toast or a formal introduction, or when used in direct address.
  • Compositions: Titles of books, journals, magazines, newspapers, brochures, movies, paintings, sculptures, plays, record albums, operas and other freestanding or long musical works are italicized. Titles of short stories, articles, chapters, poems, songs and other shorter works as well as radio and television shows are enclosed in quotation marks, not italicized. When newspapers and periodicals are mentioned in text, an initial “the,” even if part of the official title, is lowercased unless it begins a sentence and not italicized. See also capitalization.
  • Legislative: Capitalize and spell out governor, senator and representative when used before a name (Governor Joe Smith) for most purposes, including letters and advertisements; abbreviating to Gov., Sen. and Rep. according to AP style is acceptable in a news article. Just be consistent throughout your document or publication. Do not use legislative titles before a name on second reference unless part of a direct quotation.
  • Occupational: Titles of persons holding offices such as those listed below are rarely used before names as part of the names, often because of their length. Preferred usage is to lowercase occupational titles and use commas to set them off following names. Note the capitalization and format of the following examples:
    • the vice president; Sue Jones, vice president for Finance and Support Services
    • the associate vice president; John Williams, associate vice president for Enrollment Management and Marketing
    • the director; Jane Smith, director of University Marketing
    • the registrar; Jim Williams, registrar
    • the chief executive officer; John Doe, the chief operating officer of XYZ Corporation
  • Social: Social titles such as Mr., Mrs., Ms. and Dr. may be omitted in most contexts with no loss of respect. When an academic degree or professional designation follows a name, social titles are always omitted. When used, social titles are always abbreviated, whether preceding a full name or surname only.

TOEFL

TOEFL is acceptable on second reference for the Test of English as a Foreign Language.

Tomás Rivera Mexican American Children's Book Award

Texas State University’s College of Education developed the Tomás Rivera Mexican American Children’s Book Award to honor authors and illustrators who create literature that depicts the Mexican American experience. The award was established in 1995 and was named in honor of Dr. Tomás Rivera, a distinguished alumnus of Texas State University.

toward, forward, backward, afterward

No final “s” is needed.

TSIE

Texas State Intensive English language program. Spell out on first reference and use TSIE on second and subsequent references.

tuition

Use “Texas resident” or “nonresident” to describe these types of tuition rates at Texas State.

under, less than

Use “under” only use when referring to spatial relations: The cat was under the table. Use “less than” for quantities: The meeting took less than 30 minutes.

under way

Always two words.

unique

This is not a synonym for unusual. It means one of a kind. Something cannot be “more unique” or “most unique.”

United States, U.S.

The abbreviation U.S. is acceptable as a noun or adjective for United States.

university

The preferred guideline for Texas State communications such as periodicals, websites, brochures and other marketing materials, including advertisements, posters, direct mail pieces, etc., is to lowercase “university” when used alone and capitalize it only when used as part of a proper name: Texas State University, Harvard University; Texas State is a great university. However, in some more formal contexts, capitalizing the word “University” when it stands alone but refers specifically to Texas State University is acceptable: Texas State University was founded in 1899. The University opened its doors in 1903.

University Camp

A 126-acre recreation area on the Blanco River near Wimberley. It was a gift from Sallie Beretta, who was once a regent for the university.

University Police Department

 UPD is acceptable on second reference.

The University Star

The official student newspaper of Texas State.

URLs

See http://. If you bold or italicize the URLs in your document, be consistent.

Vaquero statue

Unveiled in 2013 outside Old Main. Bill and Sally Wittliff donated the 18-foot statue to celebrate Texas and Mexico's shared cowboy heritage. Capitalize Vaquero when used as the name of the statue. Lowercase vaquero when referring to a Mexican cowboy.

Veterans Day

No apostrophe.

vice president

Do not hyphenate. Capitalize before a name: Vice President Ann Johnson. Lowercase after a name: Bill Smith, vice president for Student Affairs. See titles.

Wacker, Jim

See Jim Wacker Field.

web

Lowercase web, the short form of World Wide Web, a proper noun. The web is a subset, not a synonym for, the internet.

web addresses

Don't use "http://" or "www" with web addresses unless it is required for the URL to work. See http://.

website

Lowercase and one word. Also, webcam, webcast, webmaster are lowercased and one word.

weights

Use figures and spell out the unit of measurement: The baby weighed 6 pounds, 13 ounces. She had a 6-pound, 13-ounce baby.

Wells Fargo Terrace

The balcony on the second floor of the End Zone Complex at Bobcat Stadium.

West Campus

Capitalize. This part of the Texas State campus was the San Marcos Baptist Academy until 1979 when the university purchased the land and buildings.

West Side Complex

Formal name is Jerry D. and Linda Gregg Fields Bobcat Stadium West Side Complex. Use West Side Complex on second reference.

who’s, whose

“Who’s” is the contraction for “who is”: Who’s there? “Whose” is possessive: Whose book is that?

winter break

Do not capitalize.

The Wittliff Collections

The Southwestern Writers Collection, the Southwestern & Mexican Photography Collection and the Lonesome Dove Collection are known collectively as the Wittliff Collections. Whenever possible, refer to the Wittliff Collections as a whole. Use a plural verb with "the Wittliff Collections" and a singular verb when referring to the institution as "the Wittliff." Always use "the Wittliff Collections" as the first reference in text.

work-study

Hyphenate.

www

Don’t include "www" in a Web address unless it is required for the URL to work.

y’all

Not ya’ll; it’s abbreviating you all, not ya all. Use only in a direct quote.

ZIP code

ZIP stands for Zoning Improvement Plan, so it is always all caps. The word “code” should always be lowercased. Do not place a comma between the state name and the ZIP code.